A Chance Encounter Gives a Lifelong Traveler One More Journey

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After her husband Gordon Scott's passing, Beverly Smith threw her husband's ashes into the Florida Keys with a note and some spare change - money to let the bottle recipient call Smith and inform her of her husband's new locale. Scott, a lifetime lover of travel and adventure, would get one more chance to go across the world. Since then, Scott has traveled up and down the Florida coast, floating from beach to beach.

Nature of the Day: This is What It’s Like to Swim in a Lake Full of Jellyfish

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Nature can be pretty terrifying sometimes (we’re looking at you Australia), but it can also be pretty magical as shown in this new video from a snorkeler in Palau.

It was shot in a body of water called Jellyfish Lake, which is home to millions of the alien-like animals.

The species seen here is the golden jellyfish, which are always on the move as the sun rises and sets to expose the light to their symbiotic algae.

According to National Geographic:

Before sunrise, the jellies cluster along the saltwater lake’s western shore. Each morning around 6, when dawn brightens the eastern sky, they begin to swim toward the light. Pumping water through their bells, these jellyfish use a type of jet propulsion to follow the sunlight until they nearly reach the eastern shore—stopping just short of the shadows caused by lakeside trees.

They also are pretty harmless, so swimmers don’t have to worry about getting stung by the numerous creatures. Because they’ve been isolated to this one spot, their sting has gradually gotten weaker to the point where you would hardly feel anything, according to The Nature Conservacy.

Anyone is allowed to snorkel around in the lake, you just can’t go scuba diving.

“Swimming with literally millions of jellyfish was absolutely surreal,” the uploader writes in the caption. “A reminder that there will always be surprises out there!”

Nightmare Fuel of the Day: Terrifying Robotic Cheetah Has Learned to Jump

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Well, it’s only a matter of time now.

We’ve seen self-flying drones, supercharged drones, robotic hell hounds that can withstand a good kicking and human-like bots that are taking over businesses in Japan.

Pretty soon we will be slaves to these things, which are growing smarter every day.

Researchers at MIT have successfully created “the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously” thanks to new technological developments with its DARPA-funded robotic cheetah.

It uses a built-in laser system called LIDAR to see things in its line of vision and then figures out the best way to go get over it.

For example, imagine a swarm of rebel Amazon drones just dropped a bunch of Kindle Fire tablets on your head putting you out of commission.

If one of these robotic cats happen to come across your lifeless corpse, it could very easily leap over it without any sort of human guidance.

Here’s an explanation of how it works from MIT’s press release:

To get a running jump, the robot plans out its path, much like a human runner: As it detects an approaching obstacle, it estimates that object’s height and distance. The robot gauges the best position from which to jump, and adjusts its stride to land just short of the obstacle, before exerting enough force to push up and over. Based on the obstacle’s height, the robot then applies a certain amount of force to land safely, before resuming its initial pace.

It was able to successfully conquer hurdles up to 18-inches tall while going about 5mph.

Here’s a less threatening video of the cheetah running across some grass, but don’t be deceived by the innocent-looking prance.

The end is neigh.