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beer,funny,news,Turkey,thanksgiving,after 12,g rated
By Unknown
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When it comes to pairing beer with poultry, Joe Morette isn't too fussy. His turkeys will drink just about anything.

Morette, who is raising about 50 Thanksgiving turkeys this year, has been giving his birds beer since 1993, when he and his workers popped open a few cans after work on a hot July day. A turkey knocked one over and started drinking, he said, and they've been sipping the suds ever since.

Morette, who prefers serving the turkeys lager, insists the beer makes birds fatter, more flavorful and juicier.

"Oh, yeah, it's noticeable," he said. "It's not a strong, gamey flavor, it's a nice turkey flavor."
beer,news,wtf,label,funny,after 12,g rated
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This year alone, 29,500 individually designed beer labels have been submitted for approval to the Trade Department's Tax and Trade Bureau. And every single one of those label designs was approved or denied by a single man: Kent "Battle" Martin, a man who is the bane of the beer industry for his power to reject labels for the flimsiest of reasons.


Here are a few of the reasons:

Battle has rejected a beer label for the King of Hearts, which had a playing card image on it, because the heart implied that the beer would have a health benefit.

He rejected a beer label featuring a painting called The Conversion of Paula By Saint Jerome because its name, St. Paula's Liquid Wisdom, contained a medical claim--that the beer would grant wisdom.

He rejected a beer called Pickled Santa because Santa's eyes were too "googly" on the label, and labels cannot advertise the physical effects of alcohol. (A less googly-eyed Santa was later approved.)

He rejected a beer called Bad Elf because it featured an "Elf Warning," suggesting that elves not operate toy-making machinery while drinking the ale. The label was not approved on the grounds that the warning was confusing to consumers.
beer,news,car,ocktober fest
By Unknown
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The 40-year-old, named as Andreas O., left his silver VW Golf in a side-street, near a tram stop, before hurrying to get a tram to the Theresienwiese where the Oktoberfest is held.

But after a day of beer, roast ox and folk music, the factory worker realized he had forgotten the names of both the street and the tram stop – and had no idea where his vehicle could be.
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Bypassing the stomach and liver by inhaling alcohol can lead to some horrible mishaps.

"When you inhale alcohol, it goes directly into the lungs and circumnavigates the liver," he told the New York Daily News. "The liver is what metabolizes alcohol, but when you inhale it, it goes directly from the lungs to the brain," he said.
science drugs brewing You Can Now Brew Morphine With Specialized Yeast
Via: Uproxx
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Though when we say "you" we mean "scientists with the appropriate time and resources to devote to a very fragile and complicated process". Scientists from U.C. Berkeley, Concordia University in Montreal and University of Calgary have developed a fifteen step process using three different genetically modified yeasts to turn glucose into morphine. Eventually, it could be used to produce opiod drugs easier but at the moment it takes 53 gallons of the specialized yeast to create 30 mg of morphine. 

beer,news,awesome,Travel
By Unknown
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Josh Thomas loves beer, and that intense love of the holy beverage took him to a rather unexpected place North Korea:

"Their beer is very similar to the American beer brand Anchor Steam. Darker, fuller-bodied, hoppier, and delicious, it was hands down better than South Korean beer!"

Read the full article here.

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