history

literature,history,wax statue,forensic science,jane austen
Via: The Guardian
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The Jane Austen Centre claims to have drawn on forensic techniques and eye-witness accounts to create the closest ever likeness of the Pride and Prejudice novelist.

Their waxwork went on display at the centre in Bath on Wednesday morning. It has taken three years to create, with forensic artist Melissa Dring taking as her starting point the sketch done by Austen's sister Cassandra in 1810, the only accepted portrait of the writer other than an 1870 adaptation of that picture. She then used contemporary eyewitness descriptions of the novelist to come up with her own likeness.
archeology,history,science,cave painting
Via: NPR
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Via NPR:

Prehistoric cave paintings of animals and human hands in Indonesia are as ancient as similar paintings found in Western Europe, according to a new study that suggests humans may have carried this art tradition with them when they migrated out of Africa.

"Until now, we've always believed that cave painting was part of a suite of complex symbolic behavior that humans invented in Europe," says archaeologist Alistair Pike of the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom. "This is actually showing that it's highly unlikely that the origin of painting caves was in Europe."

By Unknown
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Originally called 'Heracleion' by the Greeks but named 'Thonis' by the ancient Egyptians, the existence of the mythical city was confirmed to be true when in 2000, Dr. Frank Goddio (an underwater archaeologist) made one of the most important discoveries of the 21st century. long with his team from the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology, he unearthed the lost city, revealing a treasure trove of artifacts and ruins some 30ft under the Mediterranean Sea in Aboukir Bay, Alexandria. For the past 13 years they have been painstakingly excavating the area, lifting up pieces of history, long since forgotten, from the bottom of the ocean.
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