Astronomy

awesome Astronomy science - 8380882176
Via: NASA
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Via NASA:

Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula.

galaxies Astronomy science funny - 7712986112
By Unknown
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The Hickson Compact Group 87 (HGC 87) is a small group of galaxies in which each galaxy is stretching each other gravitationally. It takes roughly 100 million years for these galaxies to orbit around their common center.
voyager 2 approaches neptune
Via: NASA
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Via NASA:

wo hours before closest approach to Neptune in 1989, the Voyager 2 robot spacecraft snapped this picture. Clearly visible for the first time were long light-colored cirrus-type clouds floating high in Neptune's atmosphere. Shadows of these clouds can even be seen on lower cloud decks. Most of Neptune's atmosphere is made of hydrogen and helium, which is invisible.Neptune's blue color therefore comes from smaller amounts of atmospheric methane, which preferentially absorbs red light. Neptune has the fastest winds in the Solar System, with gusts reaching 2000 kilometers per hour. Speculation holds that diamonds may be created in the dense hot conditions that exist under the cloud tops of Uranus and Neptune. Twenty-six years later,NASA's New Horizons is poised to be the first spacecraft to zoom past Pluto this July.
galileo history Astronomy science funny - 8302868736
Via: MNN
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Via MNN:

Neptune was supposedly discovered in 1846 by Johann Gottfried Galle using calculations by Urbain Le Verrier and John Couch Adams, making it a joint British-French-German discovery.

But these astronomers were not the first to observe Neptune. That honor goes to the famous Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei.

While sketching the moons of Jupiter with his newly discovered telescope, Galileo twice drew Neptune, which happened to be in conjunction with Jupiter in early 1613. It's usually said that Galileo mistook Neptune for a star because of its slow movement.