vine

Prolific Vine-er J. Cyrus breaks down exactly what's terrible about the social network, and soon after many more join in on the joke. Check out a few below!

rage,vine,satire,parentbook,Overshare,Video,failbook
View List
  • -
  • Vote
  • -
By Unknown
  • -
  • Vote
  • -



  • -
  • Vote
  • -

They may have moved on from controversial dresses and DIY lip enhancements, but now teenagers have a new craze to keep themselves busy: black magic.

A game similar to the Ouija Board called the “Charlie Charlie Challenge” has taken over Twitter, Instagram and Vine over the last few days, which has people using pencils to summon a Mexican demon that will answer any question you ask it.

So how does it work exactly?

First you place two pencils on top of each other in the shape of a cross creating four quadrants on a piece of paper.

Two of them are labeled “yes” and the other two are labelled “no.”



You must then recite the phrase “Charlie, Charlie, are you here,” (or “can we play”) and if the top pencil points towards “Yes” then – congratulations – you have successfully summoned a demon!

Charlie will answer any important life question you wish to ask, including which member of One Direction you’ll eventually marry.

Because apparently Mexican demons have a lot of free time on their hands.

All you have to do is change the options in the quadrants to whatever you wish to know. Just remember to say “Charlie Charlie can we stop” when you’re finished, or else you will leave a portal to Hell open inside your home.

An alternate version of the game involves two players each holding 3 pencils in the shape of a rectangle. If the pencils move up or in, it is considered a “yes” response, and if they move down or out, it’s a “no.”

never gonna give you up,twitter,android,rickroll,will smidlein,vine,rickrolled,rick astley,funny,failbook
Via: The Verge
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Cleveland-based web developer Will Smidlein thought he would poke around with Vine's code seeing as it was just released on the Android platform.

To test his meddling, Smidlein posted the full-length version of "Never Gonna Give You Up" to Vine, which technically only allows user video posts to be 6 seconds or shorter. It wasn't long before Twitter, creators of Vine, had one of their engineers contact Smidlein directly and asked him to please remove his video, as it was causing some "technical difficulties." Smidlein promptly deleted the video and was rather apologetic about the whole situation:

Don't feel too bad, Will. The engineers probably shouldn't have pushed such easily breakable code in the first place.

Back to Top