world record

By Unknown
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People that knew that there was a world record for "Dominoes made of people and mattresses" before the other day? Not many, I suspect. Now? At least several more.

Hidekichi Miyazaki breaks the world record for the 100-Meter Dash.
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A Japanese man believes he can improve his time, even though he just received the Guinness World Record for fastest 100-meter dash by a person over 105 years old.



The Japan Times has the story:

Hidekichi Miyazaki, dubbed "Golden Bolt" after the fastest man on the planet, clocked 42.22 seconds in Kyoto to set a world record in the 100-meter dash for the over-105 age category — which had been nonexistent — a day after his birthday.

"I'm not happy with the time," the pint-size Miyazaki said in an interview after catching his wind. "I started shedding tears during the race because I was going so slowly. Perhaps I'm getting old!"

Indeed, so leisurely was his pace that Bolt could have run his world record of 9.58 seconds four times, or practically completed a 400-meter race — a fact not lost on Miyazaki.

...Asked about Bolt's latest heroics at the IAAF World Championships last month in Beijing, Miyazaki screwed up his nose and said with a chuckle: "He hasn't raced me yet!"

The twinkle-toed Miyazaki, who holds the 100-meter record for centenarians at 29.83 seconds, insisted there was still time for a dream race against the giant Jamaican.



Miyazaki said he thought he could get his time down to 35 seconds and we believe him.

Keep going!

art gifs design world record - 8432902400
Via Gif-iti
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Whiskey brand Ballantine’s teamed up with British street artist INSA to created what they are calling the world’s largest animated GIF.

The piece was created at the end of last year in Rio De Janeiro with a team of 20 people. It took about 4 days to complete the 57,515 square-meter image which consisted of four different paintings.

INSA dubs himself a ‘GIF-ITI’ artist, and he has created numerous animated works such as this in which he paints and repaints designs over and over again, stitching photos of them together to create movement.

In this case, he used a satellite in space to take the pictures.

“The internet has kind of changed our view on art,” he says. “And I wanted to cross both worlds and make work that existed in online space even more than it existed in the real space.”

Here’s a video explaining the new work.