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This GoPro camera has boldly gone where no GoPro camera has gone before.

Well, they have been nearly everywhere at this point, but this one is definitely hard to beat.

Over the summer, astronauts from NASA and the European Space Agency inserted a sealed GoPro camera into a water bubble to investigate water surface tension in microgravity on the International Space Station.

They also shot the video with a 3D camera, so if you have red-blue stereoscopic 3D vision glasses, you can watch that version here.

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If you have dreams of someday traveling into space, this video might make you drool with anticipation.

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst put together this amazing timelapse using 12,500 images taken during his six-month Blue Dot mission aboard the International Space Station.

During his time up there, he had a number of major accomplishments. According to the ESA, these included "installing ESA's furnace that can suspend and cool molten metal in mid-air, a spacewalk to maintain and improve the Space Station, and the docking of Europe's last Automated Transfer Vehicle – the largest spacecraft to supply the research centre."

Gerst would often set up cameras to take photos while he conducted his work, and you can check out his full feed of images on his Flickr page.

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Flat Earthers Will Say That It's Photoshop

We would like to say that you can't argue with photographic evidence but some people can and DO argue that the Earth is actually flat. If you're not a government clone of a celebrity (like Tila Tequila) or if you believe in science, you'll still love these amazing pictures of Earth from outer space.

astronaut posting pics of earth from space
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science is rad space space is rad the moon - 4952771584
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One side of the moon always faces toward our planet. The side that faces away should be referred to as the "far side of the moon" instead of the "dark side of the moon," as it receives just as much sunlight as the side that faces us. This image shows the moon's topography from LRO's LOLA instruments with the highest elevations in red and the lowest areas in blue.

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Astronaut Tim Peake posted a time lapse video from the International Space Station (ISS) that caught a particularly striking view of lightening as it flew over Earth. According to the caption, all these lightening strikes happened in a matter of minutes:

Flying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).


As the ISS orbits the Earth astronauts living in the space station have the chance to take amazing time lapse video like this and others.