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NASA released images of the recent solar eclipse. When seen from the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) it's just the shadow of the moon traveling across Earth. 

This is a first, according to Adam Szabo, NASA’s project scientist for DSCOVR: 

What is unique for us is that being near the Sun-Earth line, we follow the complete passage of the lunar shadow from one edge of the Earth to the other. A geosynchronous satellite would have to be lucky to have the middle of an eclipse at noon local time for it. I am not aware of anybody ever capturing the full eclipse in one set of images or video.



via earthobservatory

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extreme photography skydiving space stunt whee - 5986139648
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Expert Skydiver "Fearless Felix" Baumgartner prepares for a jump from thirteen miles over Roswell, New Mexico. Check the via link for the full story!

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In December 2014 and June 2015, as an astronomer I was lucky enough to to visit La Silla Observatory in Chile. Part of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla is home to dozens of working telescopes, including the 1.2m Swiss Telescope, on which I worked. While there I turned my camera to the skies, taking nearly 10,000 photos. This video is the result.
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The End of Times is Nigh! Crazy Lightning Storm Lights Up The Arctic, Even in Space

Nearly 50 lightning strikes happened during a record setting heat-wave in the Arctic in July. This was in addition to over 1000 of them hitting over a wider area during a massive storm. This was one of the furthest examples of lightning strikes anywhere in the world in weather forecasters memories, with the closest being in Fairbanks, Alaska. While lightning strikes do occur in the Arctic, they are much rarer in such frequency, because the air is usually to cold and dry for such a major storm to be able to form.

Warming in the arctic caused a super rare lightning storm near the North Pole
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Bill! Bill! Bill! Bill!

Bill Nye appeared on Whose Line is is Anyway and showed that this Science Guy has some serious comedy chops.

With fan favorites, Ryan Stiles and Colin Mochrie, the trio played a game where Stiles' hands were provided by Mochrie. And they were all in space because duh—science.

Things got hilarious very quickly, with Bill Nye having to taste some of the "space food."

Ryan ended the skit on this final gross note.