science

space science mars NASA Successfully Tested the Rocket Engine That Might Take Humans to Mars
Via NASA
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According to NASA's article on the test, this is a big step toward sending a manned mission to Mars:

NASA successfully tested the first deep space RS-25 rocket engine for 500 seconds March 10, clearing a major milestone toward the next great era of space exploration. The next time rocket engine No. 2059 fires for that length of time, it will be carrying humans on their first deep-space mission in more than 45 years.

This is all part of a plan to send humans to Mars by 2030, which NASA has laid out in this beautifully illustrated image:

science technology TV This Bendable TV Will Stick To Walls Like a Magnet
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This amazingly thin TV was created by LG and can be mounted onto the wall with a strong magnet. 

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Close-up footage of lava falling into the ocean.

trending news 104 year old cyclist named greatest athlete
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Ever wonder how your Grandpa would compare with an Olympian at their own sport?



Well, some scientists did, and they set up an experiment with seniors doing the same activities as Olympians and then measured the difference between the Olympian's record and the centenarian's. Specifically, Usain Bolt, who ran the 100-metre in 9.58 seconds...



...with, say, Donald Pellman, a competitor in the 100 to 104 age-group, who did the same event in 26.99 seconds, which was only a 64.5 percent decrease in performance compared with Bolt.

The centenarian athlete who showed the lowest percent decrease in performance between an Olympian and himself was Robert Marchand, a Frenchman, who holds the world record for his age group in 1-hour track cycling. He cycled only 50.6 percent slower than Bradly Wiggin's record.



After 40, our performance decreases by about 10 to 15 percent per decade usually, so you'd better start running now if you want to catch these Grandpas.





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3D Printed Prosthetics

Young Liam was born with amniotic band syndrome (causing the fingers of his right hand to not develop during gestation), but with the help of a 3D printed prosthetic he is now able to regain some functionality. And, the look on his face is one of pure joy. Via: Future Jam

prosthetics medicine awesome science funny - 77317
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The End of Times is Nigh! Crazy Lightning Storm Lights Up The Arctic, Even in Space

Nearly 50 lightning strikes happened during a record setting heat-wave in the Arctic in July. This was in addition to over 1000 of them hitting over a wider area during a massive storm. This was one of the furthest examples of lightning strikes anywhere in the world in weather forecasters memories, with the closest being in Fairbanks, Alaska. While lightning strikes do occur in the Arctic, they are much rarer in such frequency, because the air is usually to cold and dry for such a major storm to be able to form.

Warming in the arctic caused a super rare lightning storm near the North Pole
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Sorry bro, your days of dominating everyone at beer pong are numbered.

Empire Robotics has created a robotic arm with a specialized ball on the end of it that hardens and softens to pick up objects.

So, for example, it can pick up ping pong balls and toss them into Solo cups.

Watch it flawlessly make 6 cups in a row in the video above, and – if you dare – challenge it in person at the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

"The robot is not perfect, so it's possible for a human to win, but it's pretty good, so you'd have to be pretty good at beer pong," said the company's project manager John Dean.