Death Mars science planet - 8265360640
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There once were two planets, new to the galaxy and inexperienced in life. Like fraternal twins, they were born at the same time, about four and a half billion years ago, and took roughly the same shape. Both were blistered with volcanoes and etched with watercourses; both circled the same yellow dwarf star—close enough to be warmed by it, but not so close as to be blasted to a cinder. Had an alien astronomer swivelled his telescope toward them in those days, he might have found them equally promising—nurseries in the making. They were large enough to hold their gases close, swaddling themselves in atmosphere; small enough to stay solid, never swelling into gaseous giants. They were "Goldilocks planets," our own astronomers would say: just right for life.
By Unknown
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n the video above, the temperature of the air is much colder than the temperature of the water. The water in the lake has yet to freeze. The freezing air has very little water vapor in it (that's why it's so dry). The lower the temperature gets, the less water vapor can stay in the air. The point at which water in it's gas form turns into liquid water is called the dew point. This interaction between the temperature and water and the dew point is how you gets things like clouds, fog, dew on the ground, frost, etc.
bromate balls water science protection - 7039419392
Via Khool
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In 2007, the Department of Water Protection in Los Angeles detected high levels of bromate, a carcinogen that forms when bromide and chlorine react with sunlight, in Los Angeles's Ivanhoe Reservoir. Bromide is naturally present in groundwater and chlorine is used to kill bacteria, but sunlight is the final ingredient in the potentially harmful mix
Cheezburger Image 6573155584
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From the submitter:

In less than twenty minutes, this kid drew Jackie Chan endorsing his already high grades. An A? He deserves more than an A....how about 10000+ internet points?