science

By Unknown
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Rather than inventing a new drink recipe or two, the team looked into how you might have a little more fun with the drinks you already enjoy. What they came up with were a self-navigating cocktail boat and light-up, booze-sipping flower. Each of the inventions were inspired by nature and the physics of surface tension — and maybe a couple rounds of the good stuff.
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the asian glow elixir
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Asian Glow is said to affect 15 percent of all drinkers and about 70 percent of Asian drinkers. These folks have a variant of the enzyme that metabolizes alcohol, causing them to process it up to 100 times faster than the average drinker. Because of this, a buildup of toxins is created leading to flushing, increased heart rate, headaches and other discomfort.

Before Elixir claims to slow down the metabolism of alcohol and toxin production in the liver that causes the flush reaction. The elixir is made with ingredients like mangosteen, raspberries, pomegranate, milk thistle and B vitamins.

Antacids, such as Pepcid AC, are commonly used to help reduce these symptoms. However, they can cause blood alcohol levels to quickly rise and increase the chance of alcohol poisoning.

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drinking news depression science - 7803757568
By Unknown
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In their study, researchers looked at elderly men with a genetic variation that produces an enzyme responsible for the metabolism of alcohol that is up to 80 times less competent at doing the task.
It was associated with reduced alcohol use, "but it had no association with depression whatsoever," Prof Almeida said.
"The conclusion is that alcohol use neither causes nor prevents depression in older men.
"Our results also debunk the view that mild to moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of depression."
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old beer is rather similar to modern beer
Via Sci News
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Via Sci-News:

“Compared to modern beers, the shipwreck beers contained similar levels of potassium but 15- to 60-fold more sodium, presumably derived from sea water. This may have diluted the beers up to 30%,” the scientists wrote in the paper published in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.

“Ethanol contents were low (2.8-3.2%) compared to typical modern lagers and ales. The mass ratios of glycerol and ethanol were 4.5% for both shipwreck beers, which is typical for a yeast fermentation product.”

Dr Gibson and his colleagues analyzed samples from two bottles recovered in the shipwreck.

They determined that the samples were different beers based on their hop content.