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Tumblr Thread: Three Repetitive Types of Female Characters

Tumblr is generally the place where people get exhaustive about the annoying types of characters they see over and over again in books, tv and movies. Movies are a business and we tend to not question repetition, like these very limited types of movie posters. For some, these characters are so unrealistic that it takes away from the story. It's a bit like this Twitter thread making fun of how male authors describe women.

Tumblr users shows three types of annoying unrealistic female characters | Nerdy Male Director She had many masculine traits, like eating 10 hamburgers at once and wrestling Russian mercenaries while never going over 112 pounds. She learned these skills her many fathers and brothers, never male partner or friend, as may suggest she has some autonomous sexual history. No, men were all too afraid her, except who has mistaken my fem-dom fetish respect. If met her real like l'd hate her rejecting
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Twitter Thread: The Insanity Of Hatpin Panic

Talk about pulling a sword out of a hat. This wild Twitter thread looks back at a time in history when women were defending themselves with giant hat pins. 

Twitter thread breaks down the madness of the hatpin panic in the 1900s | Jason Poole @JasonPoolej2 Has anyone ever heard hatpin panic early 1900's women wore giant hatpins go with their massive hats
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Tumblr Drops Intriguing Knowledge on Ancient Female Pharaoh

Apparently by trying to erase the long and successful reign of this pharaoh, using her stuff as wall filler and throwing all her junk in a dump, they accidentally ended up preserving it. Pretty neat. Tumblr reviews some wild corners of history, like this thread that actually makes history fun. Here's another archaeology themed Tumblr thread about craftspeople being able to identify things that archaeologists couldn't.

Tumblr thread on interesting female pharaoh history | demands-with-menace Queen Hatshepsut Ancient Egypt. She has lovely smile someone who's been dead thousands years | deux-zero-deux she wasn't queen. she pharaoh and wanted be referred as such. she even had her statues modeled after male pharaoh's statues state her dominance and authority. she actually one most successful pharaohs all ancient egyptian history and she reigned longer than any other woman power egypt. cumleak damn no wonder she
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AskReddit User Examines Male Perception Of Romance

This AskReddit user decided to look closely at the male relationship with the idea of romance, and how the drive to find love can shape a man's life. This won't apply for everyone, but it's an engaging read, nonetheless. 

AskReddit user examines the male relationship with the idea of romance | r/AskMen Posted by FitzDizzyspells Female Why don't men get as much thrill over fictional romances as women do? Men fall love too, so why don't they enjoy good love story? And if do are favorites TV, books, movies Discussion
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Women Ask Their Partners What Labels On Tampons Mean

When Twitter User @kiiiiimberly_, asked her partner what the label on her tampon meant, and they failed miserably, it went on to inspire a movement. Women everywhere started texting their partners, and asking them what the labels on their tampons meant; and literally nobody seemed able to accurately guess what was going on. At the very least, they deserve some credit for their effort and creativity. 

Women ask their partners what the labels on tampons mean, and share the responses on Twitter.
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27 Times Idiotic Misogynists Went Full Stupid On Social Media

These people fell through the cracks, and they're here to stink up social media with ungodly levels of stupid. 

sexist tweets and posts
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Male and Female Butterfly Born at Academy of Natural Sciences
Via CNet
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The butterfly, known as Lexias pardalis, had half its body covered in markings typical of the male of its species and half covered in female markings. "I thought: 'Somebody's fooling with me. It's just too perfect,'" said Chris Johnson, the volunteer who made the discovery while working on the Academy's Butterflies! exhibit. "Then I got goose bumps."

"It slowly opened up, and the wings were so dramatically different, it was immediately apparent what it was," he added, according to a statement about the discovery released Tuesday by Drexel.
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