crows

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Guy Feeds Crows, Crows Get Back At Bully Neighbors For Him

This is why you don't mess with crows, or better yet, why it pays off to have some feathered friends in high places. This guy's neighbors sound like they were a real piece of work, and generally unfortunate people to be around. Fortunately, he was able to befriend some crows that would appear to have picked up wind of this, and proceeded to stand up for him. With all the wild stories of people's experiences with intelligent, devilishly clever crows, it's really no big surprise. 

For another glorious tale of petty revenge, check out this story about a sister who always stole their sibling's food, so the sibling took revenge at graduation.

Guy feeds the crows, so the crows get back at bully neighbors for him | r/pettyrevenge u/tempthethrowaway Feathered Friends High Places Not sure if this belongs here, so let know ok? TL;DR: Had issues with neighbor over parking. Local crows l'd made friends with vandalized his cars retaliation. So background day moved into this apartment complex our across hall neighbors started bullying us. Why parked handicap spot next sidewalk building. Why handicapped.
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Just in case there was any doubt around the impressive intelligence of crows, this video should clear that up. Crows know what's up, man. 

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Wildlife Specialist's Informative Thread Explains Why Some Crows Kill Each Other

Dr. Kaeli Swift broke down the reasons why crows sometimes kill each other, and how those actions aren't isolated to their own species. Moral of the story is that crows are some real tough mofo's, and we should be wary of them all. 

If you're looking for more fun knowledge about birds, we recommend checking out this fascinating Twitter thread on what makes ravens so cool.

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Scientists have long suspected that corvids -- the family of birds including ravens, crows and magpies -- are highly intelligent. Now, Tübingen neurobiologists Lena Veit und Professor Andreas Nieder have demonstrated how the brains of crows produce intelligent behavior when the birds have to make strategic decisions.

Their results are published in the latest edition of Nature Communications. Crows are no bird-brains. Behavioral biologists have even called them "feathered primates" because the birds make and use tools, are able to remember large numbers of feeding sites, and plan their social behavior according to what other members of their group do.