biology

biology awesome birds breakfast science - 8262646528
Via MNN
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It's everyone's favorite question when it comes to record-setting birds: which is the fastest? The peregrine falcon has taken the trophy for fastest, reaching an incredible 242 mph on a high-speed dive. The much larger golden eagle is not far behind with a maximum dive speed of 200 mph. However, this is on a dive, when gravity is certainly helping the bird reach such mind-blowing speeds.



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friends science DNA biology - 8256484608
Via MNN
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People may unsuspectingly choose friends who have some DNA sequences in common with them, a new analysis finds.

Researchers compared gene variations between nearly 2,000 people who were not biologically related, and found that friends had more gene variations in common than strangers.

The study lends a possible scientific backing for the well-worn clichés, "We're just like family," or "Friends are the family you choose," the researchers said.

"Humans are unique in that we create long-term connections with people of our species," said Nicholas Christakis, a social scientist at Yale University involved in the study. "Why do we do that? Why do we make friends? Not only that, we prefer the company of people we resemble."

biology science sensor vital signs - 8226861056
Via PBS
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The device is a sensor, and it represents some of the core technology of MC10, a startup that makes flexible electronics. Ghaffari, cofounder and director of advanced technology at the company, isn't at liberty to tell me what, exactly, it senses. It could be temperature, muscle activity, or heart rate.

The sensor's counterpart is another rectangle of silicone. This one encases more traditional semiconductor chips, each about half the size of your pinky nail. Rather than being soldered to a brittle green board that's etched with interconnects, the chips are linked by what appear to be the same wavy, bendable wires. It's not as flexible as the passive sensor because of the chips, but it's still supple enough to bend around my finger. It's the brains of the system, Ghaffari tells me. It receives data from the sensor and then processes, stores, and passes on that information.