all star

Via Pupsi
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Everyone's favorite song of the early 2000s is back in the form of melon ocarinas. We wouldn't expect anything less from the internet. Oh, and for more of this kind of thing here's Smash Mouth's "All Star" translated into Aramaic and back into English.

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Smash Mouth's "All Star" Translated Into Aramaic and Back Into English Proves The Song is a Timeless Banger

What a concept. This tweet from MaglioJen popped off featuring the translated lyrics to Smash Mouth's late 90's, early 00's anthem "All Star." The thing was originally translated by Isaac Mayer and he even performed the Aramaic version on Youtube. Still sounds like a pretty damn great song no matter the language.

Lyrics to Smash Mouth's "All Star" but translated into Aramaic and back into English.
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14 All-Star Smash Mouth Memes That'll Have You Walkin' On The Sun

From their monster hits All Star, I'm a Believer or Walkin' on the Sun, to their hilarious Twitter account, it's hard to not love late-'90s legends Smash Mouth. In their honor, here are 14 memes that celebrate the band's absolute genius. We really hope you love them as much as we do.

funny memes
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all star banned substance baseball melky cabrera MLB performance enhancers testosterone - 6524479232
By Unknown
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Major League Baseball All-Star Game MVP Melky Cabrera is the most recent recipient of a 50-game ban handed down by the league office, after testing positive for testosterone -- a no-no under the league's performance enhancing drug policy. Normally that's where the story ends, barring appeals. However, the New York Daily News has discovered a bizarre plot -- one that would make Albert Belle's Cleveland Indians proud.

Melky and his "associates" concocted a website which sold a fake product containing a banned substance, which Cabrera unknowingly purchased and used. Cabrera presented this as evidence at his appeal hearing, and probably thought he was home free. That is, until some very obvious subjects were addressed:

MLB's department of investigations quickly began asking questions about the website and the "product" — Where was the site operating from? Who owned it? What kind of product was it? — and quickly discovered that an existing website had been altered, adding an ad for the product, a topical cream, that didn't exist.

The comedy of errors now involves the FDA, an investigation into Cabrera's "associates", and (what we can all assume) an unlikely repealing of the suspension.

[deadspin]