Protest

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New Zealand's Economic Minister, Steven Joyce had this pink surprise thrown at him by someone protesting the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.

Protest of The Day: University of Texas Students Will Carry Dildos Around to Speak Out Against Guns
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You dildon't want to miss out on this protest.

In response to a new law passed in Texas that allows students to carry concealed guns on campus, some students at The University of Texas at Austin are planning a very unique way to speak out.

A Facebook event using the hashtag #CocksNotGlocks is encouraging students to strap sex toys onto their backpacks August 2016 to protest.

Event organizer Jessica Jin had this to say about the protest:

"'You're carrying a gun to class? Yeah well I'm carrying a HUGE D*LDO,'" she said in the group's description. "Just about as effective at protecting us from sociopathic shooters, but much safer for recreational play."

If you say so, Jessica.

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High school girls wear the scarlet letter to protest a dress code.
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These high school students gave themselves an 'A', a scarlet one.

Frustrated by the Charleston County School of the Arts' dress code, finding it demeaning and sexist, students decided to take matters into their own hands.

Post and Courier gives the details:

Reese Fischer, a junior creative writing student at the school who helped organize the protest, said she doesn't oppose the dress code. But, based on her experience, faculty members enforce the dress code more strictly against girls than boys, and against heavy-set girls than smaller girls, she said.

"Especially in the summer, you see guys walking around in muscle tank tops with half their sides hanging out and their pants hanging down, and they don't get called out for that," Fischer said. "They don't get called out for wearing a hat, but a girl will get called out for a short skirt in a second."

...School of the Arts' dress code states that "appropriate, decent and non-distracting attire must be worn" and prohibits hats indoors, exposed underwear, bare skin "between upper chest and mid thigh," shoulder straps less than two fingers wide, and clothing that features inflammatory or profane messages. Students who break the dress code can be sent to an administrator's office and told to change into a school-owned T-shirt and sweatpants.



So Fischer put out a call to action on Instagram last week.



Her post read:

Hi! As many of you heard, there's a new dress code policy being enforced as of tomorrow that will require students to leave class and sit in the office until their dress code violation is 'dealt with'. Also, for a teacher to send you to the office they do not have to dictate whether or not you're in dress code, [they just have to] simply question it. Many students find it incredibly offensive that their outfits are being held at a higher importance than their education. ...

Tomorrow, Sept. 24, it would be awesome if we could get as many people as possible to incorporate a red 'A' into their outfits, as the red 'A' is a famous symbol for 'sin.' We'll keep this page updated as frequently as possible so that the movement is cohesive and effective. Thank you for standing up for what's fair (that everyone should be treated with equal respect).



Post and Courier said the protest went very well.



Fischer said that on the first day of the protest last Thursday, about 100 students — as well as some faculty — wore a homemade red A on their clothing, sometimes as part of a slogan, "Not A Distraction." The red letter A is a reference to the Nathaniel Hawthorne novel "The Scarlet Letter," in which 17th-century Puritans force a young woman to wear the letter after finding her guilty of adultery.



A week in, and students are still adding the letter to their clothes.







Way to find a civil way to stand up for yourself and get your point across!

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completely relevant news Charlie Hebdo france Protest news - 8424986368
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There were 3.7 million people at this weekend's anti-terrorism rally in Paris – the largest in French history.

One of those people was Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, who wore this simple, yet powerful symbol of solidarity in his jacket pocket.

Rama used to teach at the Academy of Arts of Albania and was an artist himself for years. As mayor of Tirana, he organized a mural project to transform Soviet-era ruins into colorful works of art.

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A local Fox news affiliate in Baltimore has apologized for erroneously using a video clip of a protest to illustrate anti-police sentiment calling it an "honest misunderstanding."

In the video above, from a WBFF Fox45 news segment, a woman is heard chanting "kill a cop," which would indeed be startling if it were true, especially in light of the recent shootings in New York. But it's not.

Unfortunately for everyone involved, this is taken completely out of context, as many pointed out.

The original clip is from a "Justice For All" March in Washington, D.C., and the woman featured in the video, Tawanda Jones, is not asking for anyone to be killed.

"We won't stop! We can't stop! Till killer cops are in cell blocks!" she says as you can hear below (at 0:42).



Jones' brother Tyrone West died in 2013 while in police custody.

WBFF interviewed Jones following the screw up, and she said she is baffled as to why they edited the clip the way they did.

"You'd have to be an idiot – someone that hates – to say 'kill somebody,' especially some cops that I need to protect my family," she said. "Nobody deserves to be brutally murdered."