Genetics

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Facebook Post Calling For "Black Donors" Gets Called Out

This moronic Facebook post calling for "Black donors" was swiftly rejected, challenged, and generally condemned in the comments section. You can see whoever posted it work on standing their ground, and not budging when it came to potentially reassessing their original post. Never underestimate the stubbornness of a fool who got caught up in messing up a stupid social media post.

Company's Facebook post about calling for "black donors" gets educated in the comments section.
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Girl Live-Tweets Her Italian Family's Freakout Over Their Shocking DNA Test Results

Who knew "Joey bag a donuts" would be the straw that broke the camel's back. This family's ideas about their Italian heritage burned down in a pile of devastation alongside the Colosseum. 

cover image of a family upset that they're not Italian
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Aggressively Informative Tumblr Thread Will Ruin Pugs for You

These facts and figures really go to show the number we did on these charming little animals. If you didn't like pugs already, consider this more ammo for your anti-pug stance. If you love pugs, then we're sorry about this.

facts about the dog breed pug and how they are not what nature intended, even if they are cute
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alcohol Genetics science - 8327225344
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In the study, people with one version of a bitterness taste receptor gene said they found an alcoholic drink to be less bitter-tasting than those with a different version of the gene, according to the findings published today (Sept. 23) in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

"The two genes, that had been previously associated with [alcohol] intake, also associated with differences in the perception of ethanol," said study author Dr. John E. Hayes, of the Sensory Evaluation Center at The Pennsylvania State University in University Park. "The reason this work is significant is because it fills in this gap, because no one had shown in the lab that the alcohol actually tastes differently depending on which [version of the gene] you have."
Harry Potter Genetics science biology funny - 7934561280
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If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.