oceanography

speakers oceanography cloyster science shells fish funny - 8404504320
Via Discovery
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A clever fish has figured out that if it produces sounds in an oyster shell, the noises will carry over long distances, according to new research. The study, published in The Journal of Experimental Biology, is just the latest to show that fish are far from being silent. Many can produce sounds by vibrating their swimbladders and, like a fishy form of Morse Code, they can create different meanings based on the sounds.
oceanography crop circles pufferfish science funny - 7482568192
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Turns out it wasn't the doing of aliens who'd overshot a Nebraska cornfield or out-of-work art students with scuba gear. No, it was a masterwork by an amorous and talented male Takifugu rubripes, the poisonous pufferfish eaten by only the bravest sushi connoisseurs. Yoji found a series of small male fish working tirelessly, day in and night out, to craft these mate-attracting marvels using a single fin.
black holes wtf oceanography science - 7817680896
By Unknown
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According to researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Miami, some of the largest ocean eddies on Earth are mathematically equivalent to the mysterious black holes of space. These eddies are so tightly shielded by circular water paths that nothing caught up in them escapes.
sea cucumber butt oceanography science food - 7148273920
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From National Geographic:

One species of sea cucumber, however, didn't appear to get the memo: Scientists have discovered that the giant California sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) actually uses its anus as a second mouth.
Side Note: It also breathes with it's butt. Giant Sea Cucumber, you're weird.

oceanography squid science - 7534027776
Via MNN
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Squid, it seems, may be among the most vulnerable, with consequences that could trickle through the marine ecosystem. A new study published May 31 in the journal PLOS ONE finds that squid raised in more highly acidified ocean water hatch more slowly and are smaller when they hatch than squid raised in ocean water at today's pH levels. The acid-exposed squid also have abnormal statoliths, which are internal, calcified structures that function like the mammalian inner ear to help squid keep their balance and orient themselves.