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Note to future filmmakers: If you're going to make a complex movie about space, make sure you run it by Neil deGrasse Tyson first.

The american astrophysicist, cosmologist, host of "Cosmos" took to Twitter on Sunday to share some thoughts on this year's big space movie from Christopher Nolan: "Interstellar." It wasn't intended as a review of the film, but rather - as he emphasises in a Tweet - to highlight the science you can find in the film.

Tyson wrote a similar critique in 2013 following the release of "Gravity," and a scene from Titanic was changed in an updated release of the film after he pointed out the inaccuracies of the stars to James Cameron.

And as you can see, there aren't a whole lot of complaints this time around.

Spoilers ahead if you haven't seen "Interstellar" yet, but if you have seen it, whether it involved worm holes or plot holes, you probably left the theater with a lot of questions.

Here are a few of his thoughts, check his Twitter feed for more.

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By Unknown
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OK so maybe there is a bit of an excess of makeovers in a book that also features children murdering each other for sport. You can't blame 'em for trying to please everyone.

Planet of the Apes movies apes science animals - 8252094720
Via BBC
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The new film continues the story of that rebellion's instigator, an intelligent chimpanzee by the name of Caesar, but picks up his story after a manmade virus has devastated the human population. Amid the rubble of our civilisation, the apes are pitted against surviving pockets of Homo sapiens in a battle for mastery of the planet.

Prof de Waal calls the storyline "impressive", adding: "I'm not usually into action films like this one, but this held my attention.

"The apes are very humanised: They walk on two legs, they talk - somewhat - they shed tears. In real life, apes do a lot of crying and screaming, but they don't produce tears like we do."

However, other aspects of ape behaviour in the film, he says, are true to life.

"We know chimpanzees are aggressive and territorial - they wage war. The use of tools and weapons is also a possibility," he explains.

To quote a colleague in his field, he said: "If you gave guns to chimps, they would use them."