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galaxy awesome Astronomy stars science - 8277502208
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The Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search, or SWEEPS, was a 2006 astronomical survey project using the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel to monitor 180,000 stars for seven days to detect extrasolar planets via the transit method.

The stars that were monitored in this astronomical survey were all located in the Sagittarius-I Window, a rare transparent view to the Milky Way's central bulge stars in the Sagittarius constellation as our view to most of the galaxy's central stars is blocked by lanes of dust. These stars in the galaxy's central bulge region are approximately 27,000 light years from Earth.
awesome robots cuttlefish science g rated - 8425138688
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"A four-finned robot ripples through the water, taking inspiration from the movement of cuttlefish.

Although the animal is better known for its powers of disguise and stunning communication skills, its undulating swimming motion is also noteworthy, allowing for efficient and agile motion.

Created by Pascal Buholzer and fellow students from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich, the copycat robot, named Sepios, demonstrates that its finned design can be an environmentally friendly alternative to propellers."
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Via MNN
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Humans and honeybees live at different speeds. Not only is a bee's life usually briefer and busier, but she also experiences it in slow motion, letting her live every second a little longer than we do.

Our brains can't keep up with a honeybee's wings, for example, so her 200 flaps per second become a blur and "bzzz." But our brains have other talents, like inventing high-speed video cameras or ignoring the pain of beestings to record with such cameras inches away from an active honeybee hive.

The latter feat was recently accomplished by photographer Michael N. Sutton, who endured three stings while filming super high-speed video of honeybees at an apiary near his home in New Hampshire. The result, titled "Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee," reveals the insects at thousands of frames per second, capturing individual wing flaps and even the way a bee's feet gently sway as she flies.