awesome

student turns her exam notes into starry night.
Via Neatorama
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Van Truong, 19, the creative student who made this collection of notes said,

"I knew if I had to read through a packet of notes, I'd fall asleep," Truong said. "I don't know if I would've lasted through three hours just going through notes."

Truong said she chose to recreate "Starry Night" because of its composition. Unlike a portrait of a person, which she thought would look disjointed if made out of individual lines of biology notes, words and sentences could look like Van Gogh's brush strokes.
woo lets hear it for the brontosaurus
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Via the Smithsonian:

It may be one of the most famous dinosaurs of all time. The trouble is that shortly after being discovered, the Jurassic creature fell into an identity crisis. The name for the long-necked, heavy-bodied herbivore Brontosaurus excelsus—the great "thunder lizard"—was tossed into the scientific wastebasket when it was discovered that the dinosaur wasn't different enough from other specimens to deserve its own distinct genus.

But now, in a paleontological twist, Brontosaurus just might be back. A new analysis of dinosaur skeletons across multiple related species suggests that the original thunder lizard is actually unique enough to resurrect the beloved moniker, according to researchers in the U.K. and Portugal.
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awesome science dinosaurs diplodocids - 8195849728
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Diplodocids, the group of long-necked, four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs that includes the apatosaurus (not a brontosaurus), have never been found in South America until a new species was discovered in Argentina last week. Leinkupal laticauda, whose name means "vanishing family" (heartbreaking!) and "broad tail" (uh, ok), has projections on the bones of its spine that set it apart from any other known species of dinosaur. But new species, never before found in South America, whatever, who cares—one of the most interesting things about this find is that diplodocids were all believed to have died out in the Jurassic Period (you know the one), but this fossil is dated from the Cretaceous, making it the most recent diplodocid ever found.