space

Amazing how much lightning can strike our planet in a short timeFlying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).

Posted by Tim Peake on Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Astronaut Tim Peake posted a time lapse video from the International Space Station (ISS) that caught a particularly striking view of lightening as it flew over Earth. According to the caption, all these lightening strikes happened in a matter of minutes:

Flying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).


As the ISS orbits the Earth astronauts living in the space station have the chance to take amazing time lapse video like this and others.

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What are these glorious golden space swirls? According to NASA, who captured this video with the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), this happened when a dark solar filament erupted and caused a chain reaction.They call these cascading magnetic arches because what you see here is a lot of particles spinning around the sun's magnetic field lines. 

Here's a video where you can see what a dark solar filament looks like. The darker area, almost in the shape of a circle is it. Filaments are plasma held above the sun's surface by magnetic forces. 




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Astronaut Kjell Lindgren is getting his space suit and tool belt ready to walk in space tomorrow.

Via: StilesSays
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Bill! Bill! Bill! Bill!

Bill Nye appeared on Whose Line is is Anyway and showed that this Science Guy has some serious comedy chops.

With fan favorites, Ryan Stiles and Colin Mochrie, the trio played a game where Stiles' hands were provided by Mochrie. And they were all in space because duh—science.

Things got hilarious very quickly, with Bill Nye having to taste some of the "space food."

Ryan ended the skit on this final gross note.

There was a problem rendering this video- The video may have been deleted.
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In December 2014 and June 2015, as an astronomer I was lucky enough to to visit La Silla Observatory in Chile. Part of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla is home to dozens of working telescopes, including the 1.2m Swiss Telescope, on which I worked. While there I turned my camera to the skies, taking nearly 10,000 photos. This video is the result.
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