wtf

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"Screw this airline!"

An American Airlines passenger yelled that along with a chorus of "boos" as a woman was removed from a flight from Phoenix to Portland on Sunday.

But the crowd wasn't jeering at the passenger, they were upset at the flight attendant they felt unjustly kicked the woman off the plane.

In a video that surfaced online, the unidentified woman can be seen weeping as a female flight attendant informs her she must exit the plane. The incident started after a male attendant asked the woman to move seats, but she didn't hear him.

"You're so mean to me. I didn't do anything," the woman says.

American Airlines says the company is looking into the video. But you can't stop the rage of the Internet.



America's Dong, Florida surely provides a terrific territory for hijinks and fortunately for us, Mandatory has compiled these great comics drawn by Dave Rappoccio showcasing one of the weirdest superheroes out there, Florida Man. Rumor has it that newspaper headlines supply him with powers of unknown strength in his battle against sound logic.

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Selfie stick aerobics is the workout you didn't know you didn't want, but beware: there's gratuitous camel toe ahead. You've been warned.

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Jewel Shuping purposefully blinded herself with drain cleaner because she had yearned to be blind since she was six years old.

She suffers from Body Integrity Identity Disorder or BIID, which is usually associated with believing that one's limbs doesn't belong to one's self and manifests in a desire to lose that limb.

"I really feel this is the way I was supposed to be born, that I should have been blind from birth," the 30-year-old Shuping said.

Shuping's case is made even stranger by the fact that she worked with a psychiatrist to blind herself, presumably under the assumption that it was a treatment.

Even though she doesn't regret her decision, in fact now saying that she's never been happier, Shuping is trying to create awareness of BIID so that people don't take the route she did.



"Don't go blind the way I did. I know there is a need, but perhaps someday there will be treatment for it," Shuping said. "People with BIID get trains to run over their legs, freeze dry their legs or fall off cliffs to try to paralyze themselves.

"It's very dangerous. And they need professional help."



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