Behold the Crab Nebula

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Behold the Crab Nebula
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The Crab Nebula is cataloged as M1, the first object on Charles Messier's famous 18th century list of things which are not comets. In fact, the Crab is now known to be a supernova remnant, debris from the death explosion of a massive star, witnessed by astronomers in the year 1054. This sharp, ground-based telescopic view uses narrowband data to track emission from ionized oxygen and hydrogen atoms (in blue and red) and explore the tangled filaments within the still expanding cloud. One of the most exotic objects known to modern astronomers, the Crab Pulsar, a neutron star spinning 30 times a second, is visible as a bright spot near the nebula's center.

Science of the Day: Mythbusters Explain Gorilla Glass in Promo for Corning

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Corning, the company that makes the glass used on many smartphones, has hired the Mythbusters as pitchmen to explain the technology behind their product and of course, try to smash it.

In the videos, they dub this era "The Glass Age," and go into a bit about the history of the material.

They also discuss a new thinner and more flexible glass product called Willow Glass, which is expected to be incorporated into products for consumers in 2016.

You can watch Part 2 below:

Some of the Odd Things About Being an Astronaut

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Some of the Odd Things About Being an Astronaut
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One of the strangest experiences in space is one of the simplest on Earth: sleeping. On the shuttle, you strap your sleeping bag to the wall or the ceiling or the floor, wherever you want, and you get in. It's like camping. The bag has armholes, so you stick your arms through, reaching outside the bag to zip it up. You tighten the Velcro straps around you to make you feel like you're tucked in. Then you strap your head to the pillow—a block of foam—with another Velcro strap, to allow your neck to relax. If you don't tuck your arms into the bag, they drift out in front of you. Sometimes you wake up in the morning to see an arm floating in front of your face and think, "Whoa! What is that?" until you realize it's yours.