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Via: Pop Sci
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How flying generators work: the kite flies in a circle, off nothing more than lift and wind, and uses that motion to push air over its propellers, which in turn generate electricity. The energy is then transmitted down a tether attached to a landing station, dubbed the "spar buoy." Makani claims that the system generates more energy than conventional turbines and costs less to build.

You don't always get the answer right, but sometimes that's not what matters. Mostly that is what matters though. You should really try to answer your homework questions correctly.

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Astronomy,awesome,science,space,Mars,water
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Via Ian O'Neill

According to MSL scientists based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., the ball isn't as big as it looks — it's approximately one centimeter wide. Their explanation is that it is most likely something known as a "concretion." Other examples of concretions have been found on the Martian surface before — take, for example, the tiny haematite concretions, or "blueberries", observed by Mars rover Opportunity in 2004 — and they were created during sedimentary rock formation when Mars was abundant in liquid water many millions of years ago.
Via: MNN
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Humans and honeybees live at different speeds. Not only is a bee's life usually briefer and busier, but she also experiences it in slow motion, letting her live every second a little longer than we do.

Our brains can't keep up with a honeybee's wings, for example, so her 200 flaps per second become a blur and "bzzz." But our brains have other talents, like inventing high-speed video cameras or ignoring the pain of beestings to record with such cameras inches away from an active honeybee hive.

The latter feat was recently accomplished by photographer Michael N. Sutton, who endured three stings while filming super high-speed video of honeybees at an apiary near his home in New Hampshire. The result, titled "Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee," reveals the insects at thousands of frames per second, capturing individual wing flaps and even the way a bee's feet gently sway as she flies.
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