antarctica

explorers antarctica discovery awesome science g rated School of FAIL - 8362010112
Via Discovery
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These are the photographs and journal of George Murray Levick, who traveled with Captain Robert Falcon Scott (greatest name ever) on the ill-fated south pole expedition.



Via Discovery:

Levick was one of six men in Scott's Northern Party, who summered (1911-1912) at Cape Adare and survived the winter of 1912 in a snow cave when their ship was unable to reach them. Levick was not part of the team that accompanied Scott on his doomed quest to be the first to reach the South Pole.

After an arduous two-and-a-half month trek, Scott and his crew did make it to the South Pole on Jan. 17, 1912. But they discovered that the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen had beat them to it. Scott and his team died on the way back to their base, faced with a blizzard and dwindling supplies.

africa antarctica barack obama China egypt gay marriage geography indonesia iran malaysia map Saudi Arabia Sudan sun media uganda - 6217494016
Via OpenFile
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This week, following President Barack Obama's announcement that he is in favor of gay marriage in the United States, Sun Media divvied up a nice little infographic showing the varying legal stances toward gay marriage in the Africa and Asia. Judging by the end result, nary a one Sun Media employee has ever looked at a world atlas.

Let's help them out, though:

1) That is not Saudi Arabia, it's Sudan. 2) That is not Sudan, it's Saudi Arabia. 3) Sudan is no longer a single country. 4) That is not Iran, it's the United Arab Emirates and/or Oman. 5) That is not Malaysia, it's the island of Sumatra, which is a part of Indonesia. 6) That is not China, it's Russia (really?). 7) That is not Uganda, it's Antarctica (REALLY?).

Clearly, somebody needs to rethink their cultural standards.

crazy antarctica glacier science funny - 7649302528
By Unknown
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The newborn iceberg measures about 278 square miles (720 square kilometers), and was seen by TerraSAR-X, an earth-observing satellite operated by the German Space Agency (DLR). Scientists with NASA's Operation IceBridgefirst discovered a giant crack in the Pine Island Glacier in October 2011, as they were flying over and surveying the sprawling ice sheet.