Mars

water,Mars,science,funny,space
Via: IT World
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

What's significant about the latest find is that the rocks are the "first ever" discovered on the Red Planet to contain streambed gravels. The rocks were found by Curiosity last fall. Examining them over time, researchers actually were able to determine how deep and fast the water flowed at that location. "At a minimum, the stream was flowing at a speed equivalent to a walking pace -- a meter, or three feet, per second -- and it was ankle-deep to hip-deep," Rebecca Williams of the P

By Unknown
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Holy schnikes -- Mark Rober's story could well qualify as a heartwarming tearjerker.

An engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, Rober has spent the past seven years of his life working on the Curiosity Rover.

Watch as his whole world comes down to seven heart-pounding minutes.

[devour]

life,Astronomy,Mars,science
Via: MNN
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Via MNN:

Ancient Mars featured flowing rivers and sizable lakes — but that doesn't mean the Red Planet definitely could have supported life, one prominent researcher stresses.

The presence of liquid water is just one of many factors that researchers need to take into account when investigating the past or present habitability of Mars or any other cosmic body, astrobiologist and mineralogist Pamela Conrad wrote in a "Perspectives" piece published online on Dec. 11 in the journal Science.

"The things that make a place livable are numerous, and sometimes, there's a showstopper you didn't think of," Conrad, deputy principal investigator for the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument aboard NASA's Curiosity rover, told SPACE.com. "So it's important to take a poll of the diversity of attributes that could contribute to making an environment livable or not."
Back to Top