football

By Unknown
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Hey WINners! Today we have a collection of some of the best advertisements from The Big Game that have made their way to the internet already. Because really, who cares about sports-this and ball-that when you have cool ads, right? Right?

Or maybe that's just something nerds say while eating free party-sized sub sandwiches at the homes of their Patriots-loving friends. MAKE OF IT WHAT YOU WILL.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAFvrAbogSc&feature=player_embedded]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U38jELwi0lE&feature=youtu.be]

[polldaddy poll="5904813"]

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Houston Texans DE J.J. Watt is one of the most fearsome pass rushers the NFL has ever seen. But before he was forcing fumbles and knocking QBs to the turf by the dozens, Watt was an undersized kid with an oversized bullying problem. He was constantly picked on in school, and told that he would never play football because of his size. So when Watt met Billy, a local kid with his own bullying problem, the issue hit close to home.

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Arena football fans might have come to cheer for the Arizona Rattlers, but they yelled the loudest for dance choreographer Oscar Hernandez.

In the middle of a halftime performance by the Rattlers' cheerleading squad the Sidewinders, the women received another player on the field who just wanted to dance.

Although he wore the uniform and sported the size of a linebacker, the 6'2", 280-pound man was actually the one who composed the dance. He proceeded to shock the audience with his stellar moves and his surprising splits.

Sporting News profiled the dancer after his YouTube success:

Hernandez is the man behind many dances you may have already seen, even if he looks like he should be running into and over people instead of telling them where to stand and step. He's been dancing since age 5, cheered and danced at Apollo High School in Glendale, Ariz., and in 2002, broke into the business as a dancer and choreographer with the Phoenix Suns. He's never played a down of football, but still gets mistaken for someone who has.

Hernandez has worked with dozens of professional teams since 2002 — the Nuggets, Warriors, Sonics, Blazers, Pistons, Cowboys, Arizona Cardinals and Lions among them. He helped choreograph the 2009 NBA All-Star Game halftime show in Phoenix.



Here's a closer view of his action:

MUST SEE: Check out this "football player" during a break in the action at an Arena League football game.MORE: http://wp.me/p5Mgbw-7Zd

Posted by NBC4 on Tuesday, August 18, 2015

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