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When he was unable to lock in the friend request of his crush on Facebook, this desperate dude found her father and tried to network his way into a date. It didn't go well.

Despite being told NO through Dad's endless supply of memes, this illiterate and very thirsty dude never gives up hope.

He gets angry, very angry... But never gives up hope. How romantic!

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Via: Raw Leaks
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Hey, if you’re going to steal a cop car, why not share the experience with your friends?

Police arrested John Pinney, a Tulsa resident, who stole a cop car and streamed the joyride on Facebook Live on Monday night. Pinney's friends and followers got to join in the fun of stealing a patrol car, engaging in a high-speed police chase, and singing along to the radio without the added stress of breaking the law.

Oklahoma's News on 6 reports that Pinney simply walked up to the unlocked patrol car, opened the door, and took off.

News On 6 continues, "Tulsa police sergeant Steve Stoltz said a woman called 911 and told the dispatcher a man got into a police car near 5th and Denver, asked if she wanted a ride, then drove off when she said no."

via Gif Universe

Presumably, when this woman declined to be Pinney's audience, he turned to the officer's iPad, where he logged onto Facebook and proceeded to bring officers and followers on a 30-to-40-minute, 120-mile-per-hour car chase.

Stoltz "Liked" Pinney's approach to expediting police procedure.

"I would encourage every criminal out there to Facebook Live their crimes so that we can catch you a lot easier," said Stoltz. "Use that Facebook Live at your trial to get a better conviction."

According to News on 6, Pinney was arrested "on nine complaints, including eluding, resisting arrest, and possession of a firearm by a felon." Thanks to Facebook Live, we’ll be able to relieve these crimes over and over again.

via Hellblack

shreiff says department not checking facebook for dapl protestors
Via: Facebook
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Just a quick update on all those Facebook check-ins in North Dakota yesterday. As it turns out, the Morton County Sherrif's Department says that it is not looking at check-ins to verify protestors of the Dakota Access Pipeline. 

The Morton County Sheriff's Department took to Facebook and said: 

via @MortonCountySD

Yesterday, thousands of Facebook users "checked in" at Standing Rock Indian reservation in Cannon Ball, ND in hopes of confusing police and showing support for the activists.

Despite the validity of the original post, The LA Times says, "Some Native American activists still welcomed the check-ins as another form of showing support for the months-long protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline, proposed to run past tribal land on its route between North Dakota and Illinois."

 

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