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By Unknown
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If you want your shindig to stand out, you should ditch that traditional booze, morph yourself into a cocktail alchemist and one-up your friends and coworkers with science...

The Ouya isn't your standard liquid cocktail. It's served as liquid-filled beads formed using a technique known as reverse spherification, a fancy term for turning liquids or liquefied foods into gel-covered, liquid-filled spheres that pop in your mouth.

Check out the full recipe here.

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Via: MNN
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Since we've all likely heard about the 10 percent rule, it's a cool dream to think that there's some inner-superhero inside us just waiting to be released. Unfortunately, the idea that humans only use 10 percent of their brains is as much a piece of fiction as Lucy's new abilities to control time and space.

"... the brain, like all our other organs, has been shaped by natural selection," Barry L. Beyerstein of the Brain Behavior Laboratory at Simon Fraser University told Scientific American. "Brain tissue is metabolically expensive both to grow and to run, and it strains credulity to think that evolution would have permitted squandering of resources on a scale necessary to build and maintain such a massively underutilized organ. Moreover, doubts are fueled by ample evidence from clinical neurology. Losing far less than 90 percent of the brain to accident or disease has catastrophic consequences."
Meteorology clouds funny science
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A messy winter storm is moving across the eastern half of the United States, threatening to delay drivers and fliers right before Thanksgiving Day, one of the busiest travel times of the year.

Weather forecasters say a few key atmospheric components joined forces to create this meteorological misery.

The storm is actually the same upper level low-pressure system, or trough (essentially a dip in the jet stream), that tore over the Southwest over the last few days, Brian Hurley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service said. The storm dumped nearly a foot of snow in parts of northern New Mexico, prompted hundreds of flight cancellations in Texas and caused several deadly traffic accidents across the region, the Los Angeles Times reported.