science

electric fields,bees,flowers,science,funny
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A bumblebee visits a flower, drawn in by the bright colours, the patterns on the petals, and the aromatic promise of sweet nectar. But there's more to pollination than sight and smell. There is also electricity in the air.

Dominic Clarke and Heather Whitney from the University of Bristol have shown that bumblebees can sense the electric field that surrounds a flower. They can even learn to distinguish between fields produced by different floral shapes, or use them to work out whether a flower has been recently visited by other bees. Flowers aren't just visual spectacles and smelly beacons. They're also electric billboards.

"This is a big finding," says Daniel Robert, who led the study. "Nobody had postulated the idea that bees could be sensitive to the electric field of a flower."
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Seriously animals are amazing, this fox uses magnetic fields to hunt.

galaxy,Gravity,science,space
By Unknown
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Although they look far apart, M31 and M33 are locked in a mutual gravitational embrace. Radio astronomers have found indications of a bridge of neutral hydrogen gas that could connect the two, evidence of a closer encounter in the past. Based on measurements, gravitational simulations currently predict that the Milky Way, M31, and M33 will all undergo mutual close encounters and potentially mergers, billions of years in the future.
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