science

Via: New Scientist
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Daredevils are not the only ones using bridges for fun: musicians are getting in on the act too. Di Mainstone and her team at Queen Mary University of London are attaching people clad in a special body suit to architectural structures with strings that tap into a building's vibrations and can be played like an electronic harp.

Mainstone was inspired by the Brooklyn Bridge while living in New York. "I wondered whether there was a way to capture the vibrations that go through cables triggered by walking, traffic and wind," she says. Since the vibrations aren't audible, they need to be transformed into a form we can hear.

everyone wants science cookies!
Via: Suzy the Red
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Now you can eat cookies in the shape of Bill Nye, Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Michio Kaku. How intelligently delicious!

Meteorology,clouds,funny,science
By Unknown
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A messy winter storm is moving across the eastern half of the United States, threatening to delay drivers and fliers right before Thanksgiving Day, one of the busiest travel times of the year.

Weather forecasters say a few key atmospheric components joined forces to create this meteorological misery.

The storm is actually the same upper level low-pressure system, or trough (essentially a dip in the jet stream), that tore over the Southwest over the last few days, Brian Hurley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service said. The storm dumped nearly a foot of snow in parts of northern New Mexico, prompted hundreds of flight cancellations in Texas and caused several deadly traffic accidents across the region, the Los Angeles Times reported.
Astronomy,asteroid,funny,science,rings
Via: Astronomy
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Observations at many sites in South America, including the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) La Silla Observatory, have made the surprise discovery that two dense and narrow rings surround the remote asteroid Chariklo. This is the smallest object by far found to have rings and only the fifth body in the solar system — after the much larger planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune — to have this feature. The origin of these rings remains a mystery, but they may be the result of a collision that created a disk of debris.
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