Fox News Hits a New Low, Asks Why a Muslim Scholar Would Want to Write a Book About Jesus

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This is Reza Aslan, a scholar of religion and religious history. As a part of his promotional tour for his new work, Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, Aslan appeared on Fox to be interviewed by anchor Lauren Green. In maybe the most cringe-worthy piece of conversation ever recorded on the network, Green can't seem to get past the idea that a Muslim scholar would want to write a book about Jesus - who as you may know is something of a standout historical/religious fig

Does Imagination Run Backwards

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Does Imagination Run Backwards
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As real as that daydream may seem, its path through your brain runs opposite reality.

Aiming to discern discrete neural circuits, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have tracked electrical activity in the brains of people who alternately imagined scenes or watched videos. "A really important problem in brain research is understanding how different parts of the brain are functionally connected. What areas are interacting? What is the direction of communication?" says Barry Van Veen, a UW-Madison professor of electrical and computer engineering. "We know that the brain does not function as a set of independent areas, but as a network of specialized areas that collaborate."

Celestial Bodies Align on Saturday! But You Won't See it...

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Celestial Bodies Align on Saturday! But You Won't See it...
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Via Space.com

The morning sky will play host to a spectacular gathering of solar system objects grouped closely together tomorrow (Nov. 22), but it won't be easy for observers on Earth to see it.

The sun, moon, three planets and the dwarf planet Ceres will all appear within a 20-degree span of sky. (For reference, your clenched fist held up to the sky measures about 10 degrees across.) Mercury and Saturn will be just west of the sun and new moon, while Venus and Ceres will be to the east. Unfortunately, the bright sun will wash out the beautiful "conjunction," but interested observers can still use a planetarium software program like Starry Night to check out the stunning event.