Facebook Announces "On This Day," a New Feature That Will Let You Look at Pictures of Your Exes Easier Than Ever

Favorite
facebook-news-on-this-day-retro
- -

"On This Day" allows Facebook users to enter their own social media time capsule, a museum that pulls up statuses and photos from years gone by. You know, the super important things like asinine updates about traffic or that episode of "Scandal" you were super pumped about, or all the old pictures of your Ex that you never bothered to scrub from the internet entirely.

The feature is private and allows you to share the retro material only at your will, so you're free to crack open a bottle of Mad Dog 20/20 and cry about the state of your current life in absolute privacy. Be warned though: Expect every terrible baby pic you saw three years ago come back like the Ghost of Boring Parents Past.

Facebook Knows You'll be Back, so Now You Can Automatically Revive Your "Deactivated" Account

Favorite
facebook-news-deactivate-auto-reactivate
- -

The new setting is within the security settings and allows you to "auto reactivate" your account after a set period of time. Your not-deactivated-deactivated account can still get tagged in photos, and friends can even interact with your ghost town of a wall. But Facebook knows you'll be back. THEY ALL COME BACK.

These Designers Are Trying to Make Facebook-Proof Glasses

Favorite
facebook-news-design-glasses
- -

From Geeks are Sexy:

Echizen’s solution was a pair of spectacles which had the option to switch on several LEDs. The resulting light beam is in the near-infrared frequency and is thus invisible to the human eye, but can be detected by camera lenses. The resulting visual noise undermines facial recognition software.

AVG have built the LED technology into their concept prototype and noted that, as shown above, it can certainly be enough to defeat Facebook’s own face recognition. However, it poinst out that even many cellphone cameras used today are sophisticated enough to filter out light at wavelengths invisible to human, thus producing pictures that better replicate what the eye sees.